Tag archive: Strength Training (27)

Does maximizing EMG amplitude mean more muscle growth?

Our understanding of the relationship of training intensity (or load) and hypertrophy has changed significantly within the past ten years. While early recommendations suggested loads in excess of 70%-1RM were required to promote, or maximize, muscle growth, a growing amount of data suggests that when training is completed to failure, comparable muscle growth can occur […]

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OMM #8 – Strength on dysfunction, group physio, enhanced clipboards

Here’s a short and sweet list of what’s on my mind heading into the October long weekend: Building strength on dysfunction I’ve been meaning to write a post on this concept for ages, but Greg Lehman beat me to it. Simple quotes like these spread like wildfire on twitter, but rarely reflect on the actual […]

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Does occlusion training mean more muscle?

I have to say I’ve long been intrigued by the use of occlusion training to promote muscle growth with low-intensity training. Occlusion training, otherwise known as blood flow restricted exercise, involves wearing an occlusive device, often a blood pressure cuff, tightly worn wrap, or commercially available device allowing for precise control of pressures, during the […]

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Does volume drive muscle hypertrophy?

We’ve literally rewritten the book on hypertrophy training in the past five years. A collection of studies has now shown that variations in training intensity [1-4], tempo [5] and rest intervals [4,6-9] impart little to no hypertrophic benefit over any of the other possible combinations. Consistent with that human desire to simplify everything, we tend […]

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On my mind #4

Tacking on a full-time, professional grad program after finishing up my PhD has meant some sacrifices to my research program. That being said, I’ve been fortunate to have some great (and understanding) collaborators, and I’ve had a few articles go live in the last few months. Effects of age and unaccustomed resistance exercise on mitochondrial […]

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Slow eccentrics for growth?

After my recent post on the relationship of tempo to work and time under tension, I thought I’d take a look at the role of slow eccentric actions in hypertrophy training. In my research into tempo recommendations being offered around the net, the most common was to use slow eccentric tempos to maximize muscle growth. […]

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Tempo and hypertrophy

I’ve spent much of the last few months (and posts) thinking about the basic training variables that influence hypertrophy, namely how altering training intensity alters the hypertrophic results from training. The main idea of these posts was that, when taken to failure, light training loads (30%-1RM) can produce comparable hypertrophy to high intensity loads (80-90%-1RM). […]

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More on low-load hypertrophy

If you’ve been following my site over the last year, you’ll notice that I’ve written a few articles on the concept of low-load hypertrophy training (here, here and here), and how our understanding of the relationship of training intensity and hypertrophy is a bit skewed. These arguments relied pretty heavily on the relatively recent data […]

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Underestimating Type I Fibre Hypertrophy

After writing a recent T-Nation article on the use of multiple repetition ranges, one question from the comments afterwards stuck with me. If fatigue is essential for hypertrophy following training, why even bother with multiple repetition ranges? Couldn’t you train exclusively light, or heavy, as long as it was to failure (or fatigue) and still enjoy […]

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Effective Hypertrophy on T-Nation

Just wanted to drop a quick message on the site to let you know my new T-nation article with JC Deen has been out for a week. If you haven’t had a chance to check it out, you can find it here. I am really happy with how this one turned out. JC and I […]

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Dan Ogborn