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On my mind #5 – occlusion training, marketing and patience

I share my “On My Mind” posts every Friday. It features a collection of ideas from books I’ve read, tools I’m using, articles I’ve written or read – really anything I dig up that’ll help you maximize your performance and your health. What’s new in the gym I’ve long experimented with occlusion training, opting for […]

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Does occlusion training mean more muscle?

I have to say I’ve long been intrigued by the use of occlusion training to promote muscle growth with low-intensity training. Occlusion training, otherwise known as blood flow restricted exercise, involves wearing an occlusive device, often a blood pressure cuff, tightly worn wrap, or commercially available device allowing for precise control of pressures, during the […]

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Moving forward in 2016

The transition from 2015 -2016, or really any year for that matter, is marked by a flurry of articles either praising or condemning the annual New Year’s Resolution tradition. Whether or not you agree with the timing, it is nevertheless, effective to take some time to reflect on where you are, where you want to […]

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Does volume drive muscle hypertrophy?

We’ve literally rewritten the book on hypertrophy training in the past five years. A collection of studies has now shown that variations in training intensity [1-4], tempo [5] and rest intervals [4,6-9] impart little to no hypertrophic benefit over any of the other possible combinations. Consistent with that human desire to simplify everything, we tend […]

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On my mind #4

Tacking on a full-time, professional grad program after finishing up my PhD has meant some sacrifices to my research program. That being said, I’ve been fortunate to have some great (and understanding) collaborators, and I’ve had a few articles go live in the last few months. Effects of age and unaccustomed resistance exercise on mitochondrial […]

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A quick thought on statistical power

Whether you’re an allied health professional, strength coach, or personal trainer, there’s no hiding from the greater demand for evidence-informed practices. In an age where your clients come to you having spent hours online already trying to tackle their problem, they’re likely to end up on your door step with more questions, and likely expectations, […]

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More on eccentrics and drop set science

The end of 2013 was quiet here on the blog, but just wanted to put up a quick message to wish everyone a happy (belated) new year, and to share two links to some content I released towards the end of 2013. Drop set science A little while back Eric and Chris Martinez of the […]

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On my mind #3

It’s been awhile since my last post, and let’s just say that balancing a full-time post-doc with completing a full-time physiotherapy degree hasn’t left much time for the site. It’s been a tough two months, and after sitting down and really thinking about what my priorities are right now, I’ve rebalanced my projects which should […]

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Slow eccentrics for growth?

After my recent post on the relationship of tempo to work and time under tension, I thought I’d take a look at the role of slow eccentric actions in hypertrophy training. In my research into tempo recommendations being offered around the net, the most common was to use slow eccentric tempos to maximize muscle growth. […]

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Tempo and hypertrophy

I’ve spent much of the last few months (and posts) thinking about the basic training variables that influence hypertrophy, namely how altering training intensity alters the hypertrophic results from training. The main idea of these posts was that, when taken to failure, light training loads (30%-1RM) can produce comparable hypertrophy to high intensity loads (80-90%-1RM). […]

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Dan Ogborn